A Gray doctor now facing federal charges searched out personal photos of the federal “thugs” who were investigating him, their homes and families, his lawyer confirmed in a court document.

But Dr. Thomas Sachy never intended to threaten or harm the agents, his lawyer wrote. He just wanted to “look at the people who were looking at him.”

Attorney Laura Hogue filed a motion in federal court Monday asking a federal judge to reconsider his decision to keep Sachy in court until his trial.

Federal indictments say Sachy illegally prescribed several types of opioids and other drugs and that those illegal prescriptions killed or injured at least two people. He and three staff members at his Gray office were arrested last month after a year-long investigation.

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On July 2, a federal DEA agent testified that Sachy had pictures of two drug investigators handling his case, their families, and their homes on a hard drive in his office.

U.S. District Court Magistrate Judge Charles Weigle said that was a big factor in his decision to keep

Sachy in jail.

But Hogue argues that the photos are harmless. According to her motion, Sachy showed a patient the photos, which were in a computer folder labeled “Thugs.”

Hogue writes that the photos were public Facebook photos or from government tax websites showing the agents’ homes.

She writes that Sachy told the patient, “How’s that for hypocrisy — coming down on my prescribing medication to pain-ridden patients when he’s got a beer or a cocktail in every picture?”

And, “Here’s the government’s top-notch investigators: Do you believe I went online and found all of this personal information with just a few clicks?”

According to Hogue, “Dr. Sachy labeled the folder ‘Thugs’ because that’s what he believed these agents to be…. It was his personal characterization of the people who were bad-mouthing him to his patients and other professionals, debasing his practice and ignoring his civil attempts to have them sit down and discuss with him what they believed was wrong with his prescribing practice.”‘

Hogue writes that photos of the agents’ homes comes from public tax records online.

But she writes that “There is absolutely no evidence that Dr. Sachy took any action or engaged in any behavior designed to harm, intimidate, surveil, harass or even annoy anyone in this case.”

Hogue does not explain how the doctor found the DEA agents’ home addresses, and her motion does not address an agent’s testimony that Sachy paid an online service for their personal information.

Hogue also writes that Sachy kept weapons at his Gray office for self-defense, not to harm anyone else. She cited three previous incidents involving unruly patients, in 2011 and 2017, and filed Gray police incident reports with the court.

The federal agent testified that his office was set up like “a trap house.” But Hogue writes that Sachy did not keep drugs at his office.

Hogue wrote that Sachy knew for more than a year that he’s been under investigation, but hasn’t tried to flee or hide assets.

She wrote that there’s no reason to keep him in jail, and it could take as much as two years for his case to come to trial.

Weigle has not scheduled a hearing on Hogue’s motion. Sachy has pleaded not guilty to all charges.